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Love Magnet
February 2014

Katherine Woodward Thomas on Drawing True Love Our Way

katherine-woodwardAfter years of experiencing love going sour, Katherine Woodward Thomas set a goal: She would marry her soul mate within a year. Her quest inspired a surprising awakening that spurred her to look deep inside for the key that would unblock love. Thomas realized the transformation that enabled her success involved clear steps that could help anyone. Today, the licensed psychotherapist and relationship expert has guided thousands toward successful relationships via her national bestseller, Calling in “The One”: 7 Weeks to Attract the Love of Your Life, and subsequent books and seminars.

What catalyzed your Calling in “The One” professional journey?

I was 41, a card-carrying member of one of America’s largest-growing groups—the never-marrieds. I had bought into the cultural belief that a woman my age had little chance of finding a great husband. I felt anxious and resigned, trying to come to terms with it, but sad inside.

Fortunately, at the time, I was part of a small group supportive of each other’s intentions. So I set the outrageous intention that I would be engaged by my next birthday. I also recognized my longstanding pattern of attracting unavailable men who were engaged, married or alcoholics. A woman in the group said, “Katherine, I will hold that intention with you if you permit me to hold you accountable to be the woman you would need to be in order to fulfill it.

Her wake-up call turned my focus from running out to find love to going within to discover the barriers I had against it. Thus I began what became the Calling in “The One” process.

 
Happy Marriage, Healthier Lives
February 2014

The Positive Effect Your Spouse Can Have

coupleA University of Missouri expert says that people in happy marriages are more likely to rate their health better than their peers as they age. Evidently, engaging with one’s spouse builds a strong relationship that can improve spirits, promote feelings of well-being and lower stress.

Analyzing data from 707 continuously married adults that participated in the Marital Instability Over the Life Course panel study, a 20-year nationwide research project begun in 1980, researchers found that married people have better mental and physical health and are less likely to develop chronic conditions than their unmarried, widowed or divorced peers.

Thus, researchers recommended involving spouses and families in treatment for any illness. They further suggested that in cases of a strained marital relationship, improving marital harmony would also improve health.

 
Loving Local
February 2014

Small Retailers Gaining Force

local-cafeWhile online mega-shopping malls have decimated many types of small businesses around the country, the Business Alliance for Local Living Economies notes that independent bookstores are doing surprisingly well. For the last four years, their number and total sales have grown, despite the recent recession. In 2009, citizens patronized 1,651 independent bookstores in the United States; today their number exceeds 1,900.

In addition, local coffee shops have grown faster than the largest chain’s storefronts. Bakers and specialty food purveyors, independent pharmacies and pet, fabric and stationery stores are growing, too.

One reason for the good news is the “buy local” ethic promoted by groups such as the American Independent Business Alliance. Last year, sales at independent businesses in cities benefitting from these campaigns grew 8.6 percent; those without them still increased 3.4 percent.

Independents are winning customer loyalty in part by hosting and sponsoring events that enrich the community. The public is realizing that buying local supports area families, keeps more dollars circulating locally and strengthens a healthy sense of community that benefits everyone.


Source: YesMagazine.org

 
Sweet Solution
February 2014

Turning Agri-Waste to Good Use

sugarcaneCement that incorporates waste ash from sugar production is not only stronger than ordinary cement, it also qualifies as a greener building material. Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen, in Denmark, have found that cement made with sugar cane ash mixed in is stronger, can withstand higher pressure and crumbles less than ordinary cement.

In countries where sugar cane is grown, such as Cuba and Brazil, this agricultural waste product has been added to cement for years. Extracting sugar from the cane typically leaves a lot of fiber waste that is burned into ash, discarded and then requires disposal.

Using sugar cane ash also can lower the energy use and carbon footprint of cement production. Heloisa Bordallo, a researcher at the Institute, comments, “You are saving both CO2 emissions and raw materials.”


Source: EcoSeed.org

 
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