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Yummy Berries Cut Heart Attack Risk by a Third
June 2014

Eat Up for Cardiovascular Protection

berriesEating three or more servings of blueberries and strawberries a week may help women reduce their risk of a heart attack, according to research from the University of East Anglia, in collaboration with the Harvard School of Public Health. The berries contain high levels of powerful flavonoids called anthocyanins, which may help dilate arteries, counter buildup of plaque and provide other cardiovascular benefits.

Published in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association, the study involved 93,600 women ages 25 to 42 that completed questionnaires about their diet every four years for over 16 years. Those that ate the most berries had a 32 percent reduction in heart attack risk compared with those that ate them once a month or less, even if they ate a diet rich in other fruits and vegetables.

“This is the first study to look at the impact of diet in younger and middle-aged women,” remarks the study’s lead author, Aedín Cassidy, Ph.D., head of the university’s nutrition department. “Even at an early age, eating more of these fruits may reduce risk of a heart attack later in life.”

 
Honeybee Hit
June 2014

Scientists Nab Fungicide as Bee Killer

bee-on-flowerColony collapse disorder, the mysterious mass die-off of honeybees that pollinate $30 billion worth of crops in the U.S., has been well documented, with toxic insecticides identified as the primary culprits. Now, scientists at the University of Maryland and the U.S. Department of Agriculture have expanded the identification of components of the toxic brew of pesticides and fungicides contaminating pollen and decimating the bee colonies that collect it to feed their hives.

A study of eight agricultural chemicals associated with increased risk of infection by parasites found that bees that ate pollen contaminated with fungicides were three times as likely to be infected. Widely used fungicides had previously been accepted as harmless for bees because they are designed to kill fungus, not insects.

Dennis vanEngelsdorp, the study’s lead author, states, “There’s growing evidence that fungicides may be affecting the bees on their own, highlighting a need to reassess how we label these agricultural chemicals.” Labels on pesticides warn farmers not to spray when pollinating bees are in the vicinity, but such precautions have not applied to fungicides.


Source: qz.com

 
Healthy Homemade Infant Food Reduces Kids’ Allergies
May 2014

Start Children on a Diet Rich in Fruits and Veggies Early On

baby-eating-foodA study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology reports that infants that were fed more homemade foods comprising a higher percentage of fruits and vegetables were less likely to develop food allergies. In assessing youngsters of the same age, researchers from the University of Southampton Medical College, in the UK, followed 41 children that had developed food allergies by the age of 2, alongside 82 non-allergic infants. After tracking the toddlers’ diets with food diaries and conducting allergy testing, the researchers found that infants fed more of the healthier homemade diet had a significantly lower incidence of food allergies as toddlers.

 
Dangerous Additive
May 2014

FDA Finally Regulates Triclosan

toothpaste-and-toothbrushThe U.S. Food and Drug Administration, under a new court agreement with the Natural Resources Defense Council, has agreed to issue a new rule governing the use of Triclosan, a controversial antimicrobial agent used widely in consumer products, by 2016. The action was first proposed in 1978.

Triclosan, a possible endocrine-disrupting chemical, has been found in three-quarters of people from whom blood, urine or tissue has been analyzed as part of bio-monitoring studies; it is also found in the environment after having passed through sewage treatment plants.


Source: TheDailyGreen.com

 
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